Tag Archives: Yellow-legged Gull

Whimbrel in Ponta Delgada Port on São Miguel

RegenbrachvogelPonta Delgada Port on São Miguel, the biggest island of the Azores, is a busy place. This is true also in terms of foreign tourists and local visitors. Beautiful is the view from the pier from one of the sidewalk cafes. On first sight, it is a surprise that a wader comes very close even to busy tourist infrastructure. But the Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) is searching for food on the rocks of the wavebreakers. The Whimbrel is a regular migrating bird on the Azores, which can be observed on all the islands of the Azores at any time of the year. The Whimbrel is one of the largest waders that occur in the archipelago. Something smaller than the Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata), the bird has shorter legs, as well as a shorter, less decurved bill. Anyway the bill recedes still visibly down. The general tone of the plumage is brown, the belly is whitish. The most obvious character is it well-marked eyebrow (by comparison with the Eurasian Curlew, a bird with Continue reading Whimbrel in Ponta Delgada Port on São Miguel

The Yellow-legged Gull on the Azores

MittelmeermöweThe appearance of a black head mask or cap makes the Azorean subspecies of the widespread Yellow-legged Gull (Larus michahellis atlantis) interesting. Although in the Azores several species of gulls of holartic origin might show-up, the best bet throughout the archipelago is always a Yellow-legged Gull.

About the size – a bit smaller – of other gulls of the genus Larus like the Herring Gull (Larus argentatus), the identification of a Yellow-legged Gull of the subspecies atlantis is quite straight-forward, at least if you are looking for adult birds. The general tone of the plumage of the back and wings is grey. The wing tip is black with white spots. The throat, chest and abdomen white is white with a variable extent of black streaking on the head (the cap!). The beak is strong and yellow with a red spot almost on the tip. The legs are yellow – sometimes shining bright yellow. The eyes are white with a red orbital ring, which is even identifiable on some distance.

Although the Yellow-legged Gull is preferably marine, it also frequents other biotopes, usually on the coast, such as beaches, ports, marinas, beaches, coastal cliffs and pastures

These gulls nestle throughout the Azores in good numbers throughout the year. Look for them on the water-filled volcanic caldeiras as well. From time to time they like to swim and bathe in the sweet water of these lagoas.

The Yellow-legged Gull nestles mainly on the coasts of the Iberian Peninsula and France, on the islands of the Azores and Madeira and the Canaries, the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. In winter it is distributed along the European Atlantic coast, from Denmark to Western Sahara, and along the Mediterranean coast. On the sea, this Gull has a markedly coastal distribution, not moving towards waters beyond the continental shelf. Similarly in the Azores it uses the waters near the coast, and may be further from the latter in the post-nuptial period

Most of the population is sedentary and even young birds disperse relatively short distances. Some individuals can make wider dispersive movements and ringed birds on islands of the Atlantic were observed in the first two years of life in the United Kingdom, northern France, southern Spain and Morocco.

In order to satisfy the growing demand for top shots of the rarer species of Western Palearctic, Bird-lens.com has undertaken dedicated trips to nearby and distant bird areas. This is to be able to do anything to provide excellent images of the birds of the Western Palearctic. Sometimes the yield of images is enriched by bird species, which are very unlikely to show-up in the Western Palearctic. The results in images even of rare Western Palearctic birds are very good. The beautiful image of the blog is only a first impression of what you will find in behind “Picture Shop” very soon. Simply contact bird-lens.com if you need an image of a bird before the newest images are online.

Steinhuhn: Beobachtungen auf Pag/ Kroatien

SteinhuhnSterne funkeln von einem wolkenlosen Firmament. Es ist 3:25 – und damit eigentlich mehr als eine Stunde zu früh. Denn der Sonnenaufgang ist erst für 5:16 angekündigt. Das Steinhuhn (Alectoris graeca) fehlt aber noch in meiner persönlichen Liste der Vögel Mitteleuropas. Da kann man auch schon mal früh aufstehen. Wenig später ist im Osten schon ein Schein von Dämmerung zu erkennen. Es windet ein wenig – für morgens früh sogar ziemlich viel. Ob das das Steinhuhn vom Rufen abhält? Wie auch immer. Ich fahre erst mal aus dem Ort, halte und höre auch schon eindeutig Ziegenmelker (Caprimulgus europaeus). Die Rufe kommen aus einem kleinen Wäldchen direkt gegenüber dem neu erbauten Supermarkt.

Ich bin zwar etwas müde, bei solchem Anfang geht es aber direkt viel besser. Dann fahre ich die Hauptstraße von Povljana nach Pag. Dabei passiere ich noch im Dunkeln den Malo Plato und die an Malo Blato angrenzenden Meeresbucht (Uvala Mlinica). Auch hier entdecke ich bzw. höre ich den Ziegenmelker; ebenfalls aus einem winzigen Kiefernwäldchen. Beim rund 80 ha großen Malo Blato („Kleiner Sumpf“) handelt es sich um ein brackisches Seggen-Binsen-Feuchtgebiet, in dem zahlreiche Paare der Montagu’s Harrier (Circus pygargus) brüten. Gestern hatten wir ja schon im Continue reading Steinhuhn: Beobachtungen auf Pag/ Kroatien

An early Common Gull, Larus canus on Romania´s Black Sea coast

September is fall migration time in Romania´s Black Sea coast. After having seen the spectacular mass migration of Red-footed Falcon, Falco vespertinus, in an area south of the Danube Delta with its wide stretch of a sandy shoreline with shallow lagoons we arrived at the sandy beach near the little town of Vadu. The shoreline was dotted with gulls (Common Black-headed Gull, Larus ridibundus, Yellow-legged Gull, Larus michahellis, and Mediterranean Gull, Larus melanocephalus, Little Gull, Larus minutus and some Caspian Gull, Larus cachinnans. Additionally Gull-billed Tern, Sterna nilotica,  Sandwich Tern, Sterna sandvicensis and Common Tern, Sterna hirundo,) and waders (Common Ringed Plover, Charadrius hiaticula, Eurasian Curlew, Numenius arquata and Sanderling, Calidris alba). A blog describing what could be seen on that excellent birding spot will follow very soon on the 30th of October 2012.

One observation of a gull was remarkable. A gull in non-breeding plumage was swimming not too far from the shore. Heavy streaks on the neck were clearly visible and the bill showed a black ring on grey ground. A black area below/in front of the eye underlined the head markings even more. Only checking the images at home, it was possible to identify this gull as a Common (or Mew) Gull, Larus canus moulting in 2nd winter plumages. According to local ornithologists the Common Gull in September is an unusual record. Usually the Common (or Mew) Gull, Larus canus is starting to appear on its wintering grounds Continue reading An early Common Gull, Larus canus on Romania´s Black Sea coast