Tag Archives: Wiesenpieper

Tree Pipit: back from Africa

BaumpieperA remembrance of a song, beautiful and both familiar and strange. It took a while until I got the clue. It was a Tree Pipit (Anthus trivialis) singing in a woodland in the heath on sunday. Singing now south of Berlin, seen 20 days ago in Cameroon. There the subspecies trivialis was still fairly common near the Ngaoundaba Ranch on the Adamawa Plateau of middle Cameroon in the beginning of April. Other migrant WP-birds were Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops), Great Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus), Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla) and many Whinchats (Saxicola rubetra).

The Tree Pipit is a small passerine bird which breeds across most of Europe. It is an nondescript species, similar to the Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis). The Tree Pipit is brown with streakings above and has black markings on a white belly and buff breast below. It can be distinguished from the slightly smaller Meadow Pipit by its heavier bill and greater contrast between its buff breast and white belly. Tree pipits more readily perch in trees in comparison Continue reading Tree Pipit: back from Africa

Young Whinchat on summer morning

BraunkehlchenA fresh morning. Thick layers of fog are lying over the wetlands of the Nuthe floodplain south of Berlin. The weather forecast was perfect and everywhere there were numerous motives. So I took advantage of every free minute in the morning to be outside. The meadows along the river offer a diverse habitat structure. One family of Whinchats (Saxicola rubetra) with at least 2 juveniles were seen in uncut grassland. I placed the car not far from a pole inside the meadow, hoping a young Whinchat, I had seen before, to return. After a while the recently fledged Whinchat really returned to the pole. In the first morning light, it started to preen and stretch the wings. Obviously it wanted to get rid of their youngster’s feather dress. Successful, as it seems. With a surprised look, the young Whinchat looked after the flying plume.

The area south of Berlin has a lot to offer in terms of nature. In addition to the natural richness this is a legacy of the division of Germany, which has prevented the city´s spread after the end of the 2nd World War like in no other city. This means, that even today you often have to pass the city limits only in order to stand in the middle of nature. One of these areas is the Continue reading Young Whinchat on summer morning

Die Reuselse Moeren als Vogelbeobachtungsgebiet

BaumpieperWer die im Blog über die niederländischen Moorgebiete (Veen) beschriebenen Gebiete besuchen will oder auf dem Weg nach Texel, einen fotografischen Zwischenstopp einlegen will, dem bietet sich ein Abstecher zu dem Naturreservat Reuselse Moeren an. In der Nähe der Kleinstadt Bladel nicht weit von Eindhoven an der holländisch-belgischen Grenze – gut erreichbar über die A67 – liegt bei der Gemeinde Reusel das reizvolle Moor- und Heidegebiet, das für Naturfotografen ein lohnendes Fotoziel mit exzellenten Aufnahmemöglichkeiten darstellt.

Die Reuselse Moeren umfaßt eine Fläche von ungefähr 150 Hektar mit Hochmoorresten, kleinen, trockenen und feuchteren Heidegebieten, Weiden- gebüschen, Gagelsträuchern und einigen Magerwiesen.

Die Reuselse Moeren schützen eine typische niederländische Wald- und Moorlandschaft. Zwergtaucher (Tachybaptus ruficollis) und Schwarzhalstaucher (Podiceps nigricollis) Continue reading Die Reuselse Moeren als Vogelbeobachtungsgebiet

Pulli – young birds on Northern Sea Coast

SturmmöweSpending the yearly vacation this time in the Netherlands, it was possible to look for birds as well. Besides an observation of an adult Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) north of Callantsoog in the newly established nature reserve “The Nollen van Abbestede”,  I could see a lot of young birds – the so-called pulli – of various birds on the sea shore.

Identification of Pulli – young birds in general – not only on the coast of the Northern Sea – is not an easy task. Sometimes you are lucky with the „Handbuch der Voegel Mitteleuropas“, by Urs N. Glutz von Blotzheim. For waders some useful information you will find in “Strand- und Sumpfvögel Europas – Einschließlich Nordafrika und des Nahen Ostens”by Wolfgang Makatsch. Some nice information with images of clutches, locking jaws, dune-plumage, some photos of the nursery of the birds you will find in “Vogelnester : nach Farbfotos erkannt” in the selection  Sauers Naturführer by Dr. Frieder Sauer. Besides that, there are little comprehensible images Continue reading Pulli – young birds on Northern Sea Coast

Junger Wiesenpieper in den Schoorlse Duin in Noord-Holland/ NL

WiesenpieperDer junge Wiesenpieper (Anthus pratensis) schaut noch ein wenig ängstlich – aber auch neugierig. Ein paar wunderschön, bunt blühende Pflanzen am Rande eines ausgezeichneten Dünenlebensraums beeindruckten neben ihrer Schönheit mit einer starken Anziehungskraft auf einige Singvögel. Die blühenden Pflanzen und deren Saat zog vor allem Finken wie den Karmingimpel (Carpodacus erythrinus), aber auch Continue reading Junger Wiesenpieper in den Schoorlse Duin in Noord-Holland/ NL

Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) on Norderney

Northern HarrierNorderney, the most densely populated island in the german Wadden Sea is with good reason called a bird paradise. Terns, Pied Avocet (Recurvirostra avosetta), Common Redshank (Tringa tetanus) , Brent Geese (Branta bernicla), Greylag Geese (Anser anser)and many other birds of water are to be found there, as well as the rare Eurasian Spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia), or raptors as Kestrels, Marsh Harriers (Circus aeruginosus) and Buzzards. The birds are back from their wintering grounds in southern Europe and Africa and have reached their breeding grounds on Norderney safe.

On the meadows at the airport breed Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus), Eurasian Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus) defend clamoring their turf against intrusive neighbors in the Grohdeheller, Common Redshank (Tringa tetanus) flutes from their perch on the fence posts along the salt marshes in the Grohdepolder and the dunes to the east of the island host again a large breeding colony of gulls. Breeding pairs of the rare Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) live on the island, too. The Northern Harrier, Circus cyaneus, also called the Hen Harrier was the main reason to arrange a trip to Norderney in early May this year. Finally the Northern Harriers have returned from their wintering areas. On a trip to China – on Happy Island – Northern Harrier could be photographed very successfully on migration  -interesting enough only females. The courtship and breeding period should now be photographed.

For shots of the beginning of courtship, it was too late. Beginning and mid of April you can observe Continue reading Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) on Norderney