Tag Archives: Ridgely & Tudor

Yellow-billed Cardinal in Pantanal

MantelkardinalDespite being at the edge of its eastern distribution, the Yellow-billed Cardinal (Paroaria capitata) is so common in the Pantanal,  that you hardly can miss it. Besides being one of the most colorful birds of the Pantanal, it is also one of the most common along the rivers, corixos and bays of the Pantanal plain. Form groups of up to a few dozen in feeders, such as at the farm Pouso Alegre and on the salted meat blankets drying in the sun.

The Yellow-billed Cardinal inhabits the riverside in various strata of vegetation. During the flood season, they join the rising waters, reaching places far from the rivers. They colonize farmhouses and other structures created by human action, remaining year-round in the place when there is food. They catch insects, other invertebrates and seeds on the ground. They live in groups throughout the year, although there are strong disputes between them for space or food.

Male and female are identical, with the characteristic red of the head contrasting with the rest of the colors and with the yellow bill.

Young birds come out of the nest with their backs and bill gray. The head is brown. The juvenile birds are sticking to their parents in flocks as of December. In the following months, they begin to change their plumage until they have moulted in the definitive colors. Continue reading Yellow-billed Cardinal in Pantanal

Dull-capped Attila in Pantanal

RostattilaThe Dull-capped Attila (Attila bolivianus) has rufous-brown upperparts and tail and it has a gray-brown crown. The underparts and  the rump are rufous as well. Remarkable is the white iris. Also known as the White-eyed Attila, the Dull-capped Attila is principally an uncommon inhabitant of seasonally flooded forests, including on river islands, as well as gallery woodland in the Brazilian Pantanal, where it feeds alone or in pairs, and sometimes joins mixed-species foraging flocks. Nonetheless, the species is probably most frequently detected by virtue of its loud whistled song. Mainly rufous-brown, the White-eyed Attila is most easily identified by the pale yellowish-white iris. The bird forages in the canopy and subcanopy of varzea forest and old second growth. It is similar to the Cinnamon Attila but is distinguished by a gray-brown crown and – as said already – the white iris.

The Dull-capped Attila is uncommon and widespread also in Amazonia where it is known to range on the south side of the Amazon and lower Marañon River.

The location of the photo-shot was taken on the farm Pouso Alegre. This is a pousada which is very well situated 7 km away from the Transpantaneira. The location is only 33 km south of Pocone in the northern Pantanal. The whole pousada is a great Continue reading Dull-capped Attila in Pantanal

Schwarz-rote Schönheit: die Helmpipra im Pantanal

HelmpipraIm dämmrigen Unterholz eines der Waldstücke inmitten der Savannenlandschaft im Pantanal taucht auf einmal Farbe auf. Auf einem Ast ist ein Vogel zu sehen, der ein auffälliges Rot vom Rücken bis zum Kopf aufweist. Das sieht aus, wie ein Helm. Und so ist auch sein deutscher und sein englischer Name. Es ist ein Helmeted Manakin (Antilophia galeata). Im Bereich der Stirn wird der „Helm“ durch Büschel, die bis über den Schnabel reichen, verlängert. Der Rest des Körpers ist stock-schwarz. Das ist also das Männchen der Helmpipra. Soldadinho wird dieser Vertreter aus der Familie der Pipriden in Portugues genannt. Das Männchen der Helmpipra ist einer der auffallendsten und buntesten Vögel der brasilianischen Wälder. Mehrere Arten von Manakins kommen im Amazonastiefland  oder im Atlantischen Regenwald, der Serra do Mar, vor. Allerdings ist die Helmpipra eine Art, die in erster Linie Continue reading Schwarz-rote Schönheit: die Helmpipra im Pantanal

Rufous Hornero on a termite mound

Rosttöpfer The Rufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus) is so common in the Pantanal, that you hardly think of taking a picture, as you think, that you will do it next day. Ok, this time some pictures were shot, when the bird was standing on a termite mound. There is some examination ungoing to study the interaction between birds and termites in Brazil. A study found 218 bird species feeding on termites or using termitaria for nesting or perching . The study found out, that termites are used as a food source are exploited as a nest site for some bird species as well. Some bird species also perch on the top of termite mounds to search for their prey or to conduct territorial or courtship displays.

The Rufous Hornero is one – or the best-known- of the Ovenbirds and is from the same family as the Woodcreepers or the Spinetails. The bird looks a bit like a thrush but is very plain with a dirty white supercilium and a rather long, slightly Continue reading Rufous Hornero on a termite mound