Tag Archives: Red Knot

Sandy beaches on Sylt

KnuttBar-tailed Godwits (Limosa lapponica), Eurasian Curlews (Numenius arquata), Spotted Redshanks (Tringa erythropus), Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea) and – maybe – even one Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus) in the backlight of the evening.  Some flocks of waders are flying in. Evening mood at the Lister Ellenbogen (elbow). You might think you are alone in the world.

North of the “Kampener Vogelkoje” begins the nearly thirteen square kilometer Listland dune area. The area reaching up to the Ellenbogen nature reserve is well known by the up to 35 meters high raised dunes. They are undoubtedly one of the scenic highlights of Sylt. Part of Listland is the northernmost recreational area in Germany: the Ellenbogen. This spot is characterized by beautiful beaches, natural dunes and the two photogenic beacons ” Ellenbogen West” and ” Ellenbogen East.” Since the elbow is a private property of Listland owners, the motorist has to pay a fee of about four euros when passing In the early morning, landscape photographs can be made well with the flat incident light, then the photographic equipment should already be set up, so that at the time of sunrise you are prepared. The early wake up will be rewarded with beautiful shots in excellent light and overall stress-free photography.

The island of Sylt in the north-western corner of Germany offers not only luxury vacationers but also nature photographers a lot of variety. The Wadden Sea, with its numerous bird species, wide Continue reading Sandy beaches on Sylt

Vogelzug in Nordjütland

AlpenstrandläuferStumm stehen in der Morgendämmerung frierende Birder mit spektakulär aufgebauten Spektivkombinationen auf den Dünen und anderen exponierten Stellen am äußersten „Zipfel” von Vendsyssel im Norden Dänemarks. Im Westen die Nordsee, im Osten die Ausläufer der Ostsee. Hier treffen Kattegat und das Skagerrak aufeinander.

Von Küste zu Küste sind es nur 4 bis 5 Kilometer, aber der landschaftliche Kontrast zwischen den wilden Dünen im Westen und dem flachen, relativ üppigen Wald- und Heideland, das sich bis zur Küste des Kattegat hinzieht, ist trotzdem beeindruckend. Die Landstraße verläuft hier nur wenige hundert Meter vom Meer entfernt, und die Flächen zwischen Straße und Strand sind öffentlich.

Die Natur bewegt sich am nördlichen Ende Jütlands in einem ständigen Kreislauf zwischen Geben und Nehmen. An der Westküste vor Gammelskagen bröckelt die Küste ab, doch nördlich davon lagert sich das weggespülte Material wieder an, so daß Continue reading Vogelzug in Nordjütland

Birding at Ponta do Albernaz on Flores

KiebitzregenpfeiferIn the north of the island of Flores, there are two top birding locations, distanced only about 3km from each other. The one is the village Ponta Delgada to the east, a small site with less than 400 inhabitants, and the lighthouse on the edge of Ponta do Albernaz on the western edge. The lighthouse at Ponta do Albernaz is the most powerful lighthouse of the Azores.

The view is breathtaking, with the neighboring island of Corvo in the background. The lighthouse is accessed via an isolated roadway that extends to the western edge of Flores.

Here is the first point of arrival of the migratory birds to the island of Flores in fall. But Ponta Delgada is equally important for breeding seabirds. In Ponta Delgada, the small port and the old soccer field should be visited. The small port was productive and is always worth a view:

  • Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularia),
  • Red Knot (Calidris canutus) and
  • Little Stint (Calidris minuta)

were really good birds besides the 1 – 3 individuals of Ruddy Continue reading Birding at Ponta do Albernaz on Flores

Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other waders in Thailand on wintering grounds

Spoonbill SandpiperThe Spoon-billed Sandpiper is one of the big megas in the birding space – not only for twitchers, but Thailand in general is an excellent birding destination.

During a trip to Thailand in January 2011 I was looking for wintering birds from the palearctic. The whole trip was a great success, seeing especially many waders which are rare in the western palearctic like Mongolian Plover (Charadrius mongolus), Greater Sand Plover (Charadrius leschenaultia), Great Knot (Calidris tenuirostris), Pintail Snipe (Gallinago stenura) and Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus).

But many birders go for the Spoon-billed Sandpipers. For general directions and travel advice visit Nick Upton’s excellent website Thaibirding.com. At the known Spoon-billed Sandpiper site at Pak Thale I spend 3 days. This location is very reliable, with several individuals seen each day there, and up to 3 at once. For details of locations you can also check out these Google maps.  They show the  Spoon-billed Sandpiper distribution not only in Thailand.

At the first time there were Temminck’s Stint (Calidris temminckii) and surprisingly 3 Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus). I teamed up with a group of german birdwatchers. We also saw one individual Spoon-billed Sandpiper at a site which is called the “Derelict Building” –site in Nick Upton’s description. This site is closer (only 2 km) from a little town called Laem Pak Bia. Behind a dam, drive a dirt track passing a garbage dump and you will see the shallow saltpans already. There were masses of egrets, waders and gulls. So we quickly saw Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus), Pacific Golden-Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Common Greenshank (Tringa nebularia), Rufous-necked Stint (Calidris ruficollis), Long-toed Stint (Calidris subminuta), Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea), Broad-billed Sandpiper, (Limicola falcinellus) and many flying Common and Whiskered Tern Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) and Whiskered Tern (Chlidonias hybridus). A nice selection of the birds occuring you will find here!

But the best place on finding Spoon-billed Sandpipers in Thailand is certainly at Continue reading Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other waders in Thailand on wintering grounds