Tag Archives: Pied Lapwing

Collared Plover on a sandbar in the Pantanal

Azararegenpfeifer oder Schlankschnabel-RegenpfeiferA tiny white-gray-brown bird runs swiftly ahead of me on the sands of the Rio São Lourenço, which is called Rio Cuiabá as well. It is a Collared Plover (Charadrius collaris). I lie down on the sand and let the bird come. It walks here, sometimes there. But over time the wader gets closer and closer. I decide to take a few photos with the 4.0 / 500 on the monopod from the plover, but also from the other waders on the sandbanks. Who knows when to find them again?

In addition to the Pied Lapwings (Vanellus cayanus) I dedicate a lot of time especially to the Collared Plover. With their chestnut-brown neck, gray-brown mottled coat and pure white bottoms, they are very rich in contrast. There is also a black chest band. The male I photograph has a white forehead bounded by a black frontal strip and at the bottom by a black eyestripe. Strikingly are the long pinkisj legs. Collared Plovers differ from most similar species of plovers by the narrow black breast band.

Actually, I wanted to make my way back today via the Transpantaneira. A rain front is announced. If the road is soaked and I have to drive with snow chains, I must pull these down before each bridge, because otherwise I will irrevocably disassemble the bridge and my land cruisers, too. The chains get caught in no time in the fixing iron or in the protruding nails.

Other sympatric Charadrius plovers occurring in similar habitats look very similar. One of them is Snowy Plover (Charadrius nivosus), the American representative of our Kentish Plover (Charadrius Continue reading Collared Plover on a sandbar in the Pantanal

Diademkiebitze im Pantanal

DiademkiebitzEin auffällig schwarz-weiß gezeichneter kleiner Watvogel steht am südlichsten Ende der Transpantaneira direkt vor dem Wasser. Es ist der Diademkiebitz (Vanellus cayanus). Dieser Kiebitz hat inzwischen einen neuen wissenschaftlichen Namen bekommen: Hoploxypterus cayanus. In Porto Jofré direkt am Nordufer des Rio Cuiabá (auf manchen Karten heißt dieser Flussabschnitt auch Rio São Lourenço) endet nach 145 Kilometern die Transpantaneira. Außer ein paar Häusern, einem einfachen Campingplatz, Anlegestellen für Boote und dem riesigen Gelände des Hotel Pantanal Norte gibt es hier nicht viel zu sehen. Auf dem Fluss dümpeln ein paar Hausboote am gegenüber liegenden Ufer. Flink läuft der weiß-schwarze Vogel vor mir auf dem Sand des Rio São Lourenço. Immer wieder hält er inne und scheint zu zögern, sich wieder in Bewegung zu setzen. Ich lege mich auf den Sand und lasse den Vogel kommen.  Mit der Zeit kommt der Diademkiebitz immer näher. Ich beschließe noch im Sand liegen zu bleiben und ein paar Fotos mit dem 4,0/500 auch von den anderen Watvögeln auf der Sandbank zu machen.

Neben den Diademkiebitzen widme ich besonders viel Zeit den Azararegenpfeifern (Charadrius collaris). Diese werden in der neueren Literatur Schlankschnabel-Regenpfeifer genannt werden. Sie sind mit ihrem kastanien-braunen Nacken, dem grau-braun melierten Mantel und der rein weißen Unterseiten sehr kontrastreich gezeichnet. Dazu kommt noch ein schwarzes Brustband. Das Männchen, das ich fotografiere, hat eine weiße Stirn, die von einer schwarzen Stirnleiste und unten von einem Continue reading Diademkiebitze im Pantanal

Azararegenpfeifer auf Sandbank im Pantanal

Azararegenpfeifer oder Schlankschnabel-RegenpfeiferFlink läuft ein winziger weiß-grau-brauner Vogel vor mir auf dem Sand des Rio São Lourenço. Es ist ein Azararegenpfeifer (Charadrius collaris). Ich lege mich auf den Sand und lasse den Vogel kommen.  Er läuft mal hier hin, mal da hin. Aber mit der Zeit kommt er immer näher. Ich beschließe doch noch ein paar Fotos mit dem 4,0/500 auf dem Einbein vor allem von dem Azararegenpfeifer, aber auch von den anderen Watvögeln auf den Sandbänken zu machen. Wer weiß, wann man da mal wieder fündig wird.

Neben den Diademkiebitzen (Vanellus cayanus) widme ich besonders viel Zeit den Azararegenpfeifern, die in der neueren Literatur Schlankschnabel-Regenpfeifer genannt werden. Sie sind mit ihrem kastanien-braunen Nacken, dem grau-braun melierten Mantel und der rein weißen Unterseiten sehr kontrastreich gezeichnet. Dazu kommt noch ein schwarzes Brustband. Das Männchen, das ich fotografiere, hat eine weiße Stirn, die von einer schwarzen Stirnleiste und unten von einem schwarzen Augenstreif Auge begrenzt wird. Richtig auffallend sind die langen Beine sind rosafarben. Azararegenpfeifer unterscheiden sich von den meisten ähnlichen Spezies der Regenpfeifer durch das schmale schwarze Brustband.

Eigentlich wollte ich mich heute auf den Rückweg über die Transpantaneira machen. Ein Regengebiet ist angekündigt. Wenn der Weg eingeweicht ist und ich mit Schneeketten fahren muß, kann ich diese vor jeder Brücke runterziehen, weil ich sonst die Brücke und meine Landcruiser unwiderruflich zerlege. Die Ketten verhaken Continue reading Azararegenpfeifer auf Sandbank im Pantanal

Pied Lapwing on sandbank near Porto Jofré/ Pantanal

DiademkiebitzA Lapwing is standing on a sandbar on the north bank of the Rio Cuiabá (on some maps, this section of the river also Rio São Lourenço). It is a conspicuous black and white colored small wader which obviously uses the southernmost end of the Transpantaneira as his homeground. The Pied Lapwing (Vanellus cayanus) is quite a common bird on sandy shores along the rivers of the Pantanal in central Brazil. In the meantime, this lapwing has gotten a new scientific name: Hoploxypterus cayanus. The north bank of the Rio Cuiabá at Porto Jofré is the end of a 145 kilometers stretch of the Transpantaneira. Apart from a few houses, a simple campsite, boat moorings and the huge grounds of Hotel Pantanal Norte, there is not much to see here. On the river a few houseboats dangle on the opposite shore. Swiftly the white-black bird runs in front of me on the sand of the Rio São Lourenço/ Rio Cuiabá. Again and again the small wader pauses and seems hesitant to start moving again. I lay down on the sand and let the bird come. Over time, the Pied Lapwing gets closer and closer. I decide to stay in the sand and take a few photos with the 4.0 / 500 also from the other waders on the sandbank.

In addition to the Pied Lapwing I dedicate a lot of time especially to the Collared Plover (Charadrius collaris). With their chestnut-brown neck, gray-brown mottled coat and pure white bottoms, they are very rich in contrast. There is also a black chest band. The male I Continue reading Pied Lapwing on sandbank near Porto Jofré/ Pantanal

Remarks to wintering Solitary Sandpipers (Tringa solitaria) in the Pantanal

EinsiedelwasserläuferDuring scientific research in the northern Pantanal between the 20th of December 2012 and the 10th of January 2013 I often observe Solitary Sandpipers along the muddy ditches on a farm. Of the two subspecies of the solitary sandpiper recognized the subspecies present probably was Tringa solitaria solitaria which usually has a more well-defined streak between the eye and the bill which are clearly visible on the images shot. On the other hand Tringa solitaria cinnamomea typically lacks these streaks, being more finely spotted and speckled instead. First I saw the Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria) on the muddy fringes of small pools, where you could see them from wooden bridges crossing these waters. There were no more but 3 individuals which you could see at one time. In between 10 days the water level rose by about half a meter. After that you only saw Solitary Sandpipers on muddy pieces of grassland between leaves of grass. These patches were characterized by highly degraded grassland, where cattle used to feed on quite recently.

The Solitary Sandpipers were never numerous and obviously preferred the open muddy shores of various types of pools. In „Birds of Brazil, The Pantanal & Cerrado of Central Brazil“ von J. Gwynne, Continue reading Remarks to wintering Solitary Sandpipers (Tringa solitaria) in the Pantanal

Birds on Pousada Pouso Alegre – the Non-Passeriformes

Hyacinth MacawPouso Alegre is a pousada (ex-fazenda) which is very well situated 7 km away from the Transpantaneira, with water on both sides much of the way now in the rainy season. The location is 33 km south of Pocone in the northern Pantanal. The hole pousada is a great nature-area with original landscape and extensive cattle ranching. A paradise for the keen birdwatcher as well as for the beginner in birdwatching who approaches that pastime in a relaxing attitude.

The owner is there much of the time, and is a dedicated naturalist. If you are birders you will be pleased with the birding opportunities, including Hyacinth Macaws in front of the porch. On the way you will see of Jabiru storks, herons and raptors a lot. You can go on other guided hikes or horseback rides. It’s all custom and small-scale. The scenery is beautiful.

You can see an enormous variety of animals and birds but also the flora is wonderful.

A list can be found at their website.

Bird-lens was invited in the frame of an scientific project to monitor resident and migratory bird species in the Pantanal of Brazil. See also the blog here!

More than 600 species of birds – almost a third of the avifauna of Brazil – have been detected in the wider area of the Pantanal, of which about 20% occur as migrants of wintering birds only seasonally. Among them are those from other neotropical regions like the Andes, but also from North America (Nearctic) and from the Southern region of Latin America (Australis).

Although the origin of migratory species in most cases is known, there is still a lot of knowledge missing e.g. about the distribution patterns, feeding ecology and ecological niches, bioacoustics and metabolic physiology (eg moulting).

It is remarkable that very heterogeneous migrants Continue reading Birds on Pousada Pouso Alegre – the Non-Passeriformes