Tag Archives: Limosa lapponica

Sandy beaches on Sylt

KnuttBar-tailed Godwits (Limosa lapponica), Eurasian Curlews (Numenius arquata), Spotted Redshanks (Tringa erythropus), Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea) and – maybe – even one Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus) in the backlight of the evening.  Some flocks of waders are flying in. Evening mood at the Lister Ellenbogen (elbow). You might think you are alone in the world.

North of the “Kampener Vogelkoje” begins the nearly thirteen square kilometer Listland dune area. The area reaching up to the Ellenbogen nature reserve is well known by the up to 35 meters high raised dunes. They are undoubtedly one of the scenic highlights of Sylt. Part of Listland is the northernmost recreational area in Germany: the Ellenbogen. This spot is characterized by beautiful beaches, natural dunes and the two photogenic beacons ” Ellenbogen West” and ” Ellenbogen East.” Since the elbow is a private property of Listland owners, the motorist has to pay a fee of about four euros when passing In the early morning, landscape photographs can be made well with the flat incident light, then the photographic equipment should already be set up, so that at the time of sunrise you are prepared. The early wake up will be rewarded with beautiful shots in excellent light and overall stress-free photography.

The island of Sylt in the north-western corner of Germany offers not only luxury vacationers but also nature photographers a lot of variety. The Wadden Sea, with its numerous bird species, wide Continue reading Sandy beaches on Sylt

Vögel im Golfhotel auf Praslin/Seychellen

HirtenmainaDas Constance Lemuria in Grand’Anse Praslin ist ein toller Ausgangspunkt, um in gepflegter Atmosphäre der Vogelbeobachtung auf der Insel Praslin, einer der größeren Insel der Seychellen, nachzugehen.

So sollte laut einem Tripreport Chinadommel (Ixobrychus sinensis) an einem der Golfteiche vorkommen. Dazu heißt es ja „… Yellow Bittern, Ixobrychus sinensis, can also be seen in the pools around the golf course at Lemuria Resort – although it is a private hotel so it may not be possible to get in the grounds.” Ich denke zu mir: “Die Chinadommel könnte mir noch meine Liste vervollständigen. „ Gegen 15:00 brechen wir auf. Fast eine Stunde Warterei auf den Bus strapaziert unsere Nerven dann doch zu sehr. Als wir gerade auf das Taxi warten, kommt der Bus natürlich angefahren. Wir sind dann doch froh, das Taxi für 150 SR bestellt zu haben, da die Bushaltestelle und der Drop-off an der Hotelrezeption einigen gehörigen Fußmarsch bedeutet hätte. So werden wir direkt vor die Rezeption gefahren. Dort holen wir uns die Bestätigung im Resort spazieren gehen zu können noch mal ab und sind auch schon unterwegs auf die nördlich gelegene Golfanlage. Super gelegen. Auf dem kurzgeschnittenen Gras des Golfplatzes treiben sich doch einige Vögel herum. Massen vor allem an Hirtenmainas (Acridotheres tristis), einige Continue reading Vögel im Golfhotel auf Praslin/Seychellen

Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other waders in Thailand on wintering grounds

Spoonbill SandpiperThe Spoon-billed Sandpiper is one of the big megas in the birding space – not only for twitchers, but Thailand in general is an excellent birding destination.

During a trip to Thailand in January 2011 I was looking for wintering birds from the palearctic. The whole trip was a great success, seeing especially many waders which are rare in the western palearctic like Mongolian Plover (Charadrius mongolus), Greater Sand Plover (Charadrius leschenaultia), Great Knot (Calidris tenuirostris), Pintail Snipe (Gallinago stenura) and Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus).

But many birders go for the Spoon-billed Sandpipers. For general directions and travel advice visit Nick Upton’s excellent website Thaibirding.com. At the known Spoon-billed Sandpiper site at Pak Thale I spend 3 days. This location is very reliable, with several individuals seen each day there, and up to 3 at once. For details of locations you can also check out these Google maps.  They show the  Spoon-billed Sandpiper distribution not only in Thailand.

At the first time there were Temminck’s Stint (Calidris temminckii) and surprisingly 3 Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus). I teamed up with a group of german birdwatchers. We also saw one individual Spoon-billed Sandpiper at a site which is called the “Derelict Building” –site in Nick Upton’s description. This site is closer (only 2 km) from a little town called Laem Pak Bia. Behind a dam, drive a dirt track passing a garbage dump and you will see the shallow saltpans already. There were masses of egrets, waders and gulls. So we quickly saw Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus), Pacific Golden-Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Common Greenshank (Tringa nebularia), Rufous-necked Stint (Calidris ruficollis), Long-toed Stint (Calidris subminuta), Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea), Broad-billed Sandpiper, (Limicola falcinellus) and many flying Common and Whiskered Tern Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) and Whiskered Tern (Chlidonias hybridus). A nice selection of the birds occuring you will find here!

But the best place on finding Spoon-billed Sandpipers in Thailand is certainly at Continue reading Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other waders in Thailand on wintering grounds

The birds of Remseck

Die Vögel von Remseck – im Großraum Stuttgart is a new book which describes local avifauna in the south-western part of Germany. It is intended primarily to show that common birds can be found at what time and at what locations without much trouble. If you follow some advice, then we can observe in the course of a year almost anywhere from 50 to 100 species of birds. “On our doorstep” but also breed birds that are rare and vulnerable. Those who delight in the bird watching, which is also often participate in the protection of these and other organisms.

This book, with images of approx.. 270 species is aimed at the beginner and want to help him to find the most common species of native birds “on the doorstep” to observe and identify. Even in the garden, in the park or at the bird feeder, there are several ways to. The text is written in german but a short abstract for the best local birding sites in the surrounding of that nice town on the river Neckar speak for themselves – or find a german friend, who can translate it for you. The booklet is full of nice images like the one you see as part of the blog. One pictures is showing the Eurasian River Warbler of the author of this blog, which has been already commented in a previous blog. At the beginning of the booklet a rough geographical map points the 12 top bird observation places and you can see, what you can expect there. An overview with images of the „the typical “species of bird, in Continue reading The birds of Remseck

Bird migration in late fall on Seychelles – an abstract

Escaping the cold and shorts days in Germany in late fall is a real privilege. This time the target was the Seychelles Islands. Relaxing and birdwatching is both possible on these famous island near the equator. Whereas the bigger islands as Mahé or Praslin are famous for its endemic (and rare) land birds the smaller islands are famous for huge seabird colonies where several thousands of birds breed in densely packed colonies on rocks, sandy beaches and trees. Looking mainly for western palearctic birds to complete the gallery for www.bird-lens.com the real thrill was to find migrating birds. Late fall is a perfect months as you find migrating and wintering birds side by side with the above mentioned endemics and sea birds. Birds visiting Seychelles also include a good number of Asian species which are vagrants to the western palearctic, too. Another good reason to travel to the Seychelles. But anyway, the list of all birds recorded in Seychelles is long and includes visitors from almost all over the globe. Thus one more reason to do the trip and shoulder the long flight.

During this 2-week journey at the end of October/ beginning of November it was possible to visit the bigger islands as well as small islands like Bird Island. Here we were very successful with several waders like Grey (Black-bellied) Plover, Pluvialis squatarola, Common Ringed Plover, Charadrius hiaticula, Common Sandpiper, Actitis hypoleucos, Little Stint, Calidris minuta, Curlew Sandpiper, Calidris ferruginea, as you see in that gallery.

Whereas these birds are regular visitors to coasts of the Western Palearctic too, the good numbers of both Mongolian (Lesser Sand) Plover, Charadrius mongolus, as well as the Greater Sand Plover, Charadrius leschenaultii, were a most welcomed observation. The black-and-white Crab Plover, Dromas ardeola, was another Continue reading Bird migration in late fall on Seychelles – an abstract