Tag Archives: Kori Bustard

Kori Bustard in Taita Hills Wildlife Sanctuary

Early spring sees life returning to the thirsty bushveld landscape in the Taita Hills. Knob-thorn trees (Acacia nigrescens) in full bloom dot the landscape in their yellow splendor, and birds too experience a renewed surge of energy. One day I saw a male Kori Bustard (Ardeotis kori) displaying in some distance from the road.

I was able to get some fair pictures of him as he stood in one position, displaying and uttering his low, booming call. I decided to stay in the area, hoping that he might come closer to allow me to take better images, but l had to abandon the passionate wait at sunset due to bad light. Although not expecting to see him again, I returned to the grassy area with low bushes the following afternoon and to my surprise the bird was still around. This time he was following two female Kori Bustards. As the females crossed the road behind our Land Cruiser, the male tried to approach them but they felt offended and disappeared. As an alternative the male Kori Bustard started to catch grashoppers quite close by allowing me to capture images of him in his extravagant and impressive beauty.

Taita Hills Wildlife Sanctuary is a privately owned sanctuary, located Continue reading Kori Bustard in Taita Hills Wildlife Sanctuary

Nationalpark Pilanesberg: a heaven not only for Kingfishers

GraukopfliestIn the surrounding bushes of the Tidodi Dam there is  loud bustle already. In the gallery forest around, numerous birds such as the Grey-headed Kingfisher (Halcyon leucocephala) enjoy the first sun beams. Haze floats above the water. It is morning shortly after sunrise. The surrounding trees of the dam form a small gallery forest, which attracts many birds such as Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas), Grey-headed Kingfisher, Brown-hooded Kingfisher (Halcyon albiventris), Crested Barbet (Trachyphonus vaillantii), Lilac-breasted Roller (Coracias caudatus) and Broad-billed Roller (Eurystomus glaucurus).

An alternative is the Malatse Dam along the Dithabaneng Drive. This dam offers the opportunity to photograph the African Fish-Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) and other birds such as Ibisse and Spoonbills at their sleeping retreat.

Not far from the Malatse dam is the Dithabaneng dam. If the water is high, you can go by car directly to the shore. The light is perfect for taking photos in the morning and in the evening. It is worth driving to the Ruighoek waterhole in the afternoon. At this small dam is a relatively low-lying hide.

From the frog’s perspective you can take pictures at the waterhole of the Kwa Maritane Lodge. The waterhole of the Kwa Maritane Continue reading Nationalpark Pilanesberg: a heaven not only for Kingfishers