Tag Archives: European Nightjar

European Nightjar feeding habit

ZiegenmelkerWhen the sun has set and dusk turns to darkness, a discreet purring is heard often over the heath in Brandenburg´s landscape south of Berlin. The rhythmic purr of the Eurasian or European Nightjar (Caprimulgus europaeus) is increasing in volume in the background. The time lags between the purring of the Nightjar become shorter more and more. Finally, the male begins to patrol its territory. Slow, excessive wing beats enhance the impression of a relevant actor in the night theatre. It is beautiful to admire the white spots on the tail edge and the primaries. Only a few moment, this event takes place; then the Nightjar has disappeared already in the adjacent ash grove.

Like all members of the family, the European Nightjar (Caprimulgus europaeus) is an almost exclusively aerial feeder that feed in continuous hawking flight, which may be rather erratic as they pursue their prey. European Nightjars hunts moths, beetles and Continue reading European Nightjar feeding habit

Eurasian Nightjars (Caprimulgus europaeus) caring the young

ZiegenmelkerThe dusk has already almost turned to darkness when an evocative churring, discreet purring song is heard over the heath south of Berlin. The rhythmic purr of the Eurasian Nightjar (Caprimulgus europaeus) drifts over heaths, moors and woods almost the whole night. From time to time it is increasing in volume, disappearing but only to catch up in volume again. The sounds hardly allow locating the nightjar but with patient the male can be seen to patrol its territory. Slow, excessive wing beats enhance the impression of an actor in a night theatre. It is beautiful to see the white markings on the tail edge and the primaries. Only a few moment, this event takes place; then the Nightjar has disappeared already in the adjacent ash grove.

In the meantime, the female of the European Nightjar has laid eggs on patches of bare ground and leaves. The timing of egg-laying is apparently sometimes synchronized with lunar phases in the Eurasian Nightjars. This is purportedly to maximize the amount of moonlight, and thus foraging efficiency Continue reading Eurasian Nightjars (Caprimulgus europaeus) caring the young