Tag Archives: Eilseeschwalbe

Pelagischer Trip in den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten

ArabiensturmtaucherKurz nach 14:00 Uhr geht es  mit dem Boot los. Der Fahrer ist ein einheimischer Skipper, der sonst wohl Sportfischer mit raus nimmt. Man merkt und sieht, daß Treibstoff bzw. dessen Kosten keine Rolle spielt. Die beiden dicken Yamaha-Motoren haben zusammen 600 PS (wenn ich die Aufschrift richtig lese). Direkt im Hafen sehen wir schon mal eine Sandbank mit Hemprichmöwe (Larus hemprichii), Heringsmöwe (Larus fuscus), Dünnschnabelmöwe (Larus genei), Flußseeschwalbe (Sterna hirundo) und Lachmöwe (Larus ridibundus) (teilweise schon mit der Prachtkleid-Kapuze). Bei den Großmöwen sind nun direkte Vergleiche möglich. So hat eine Großmöwe perfekt das Aussehen, das im “Gulls of Europe, Asia & North America” von Olsen et.al. für Continue reading Pelagischer Trip in den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten

Bird Island, a paradise for the Fairy Tern

Pair of Fairy TernsJust two days ago we landed after several hours of flights over Addis Ababa on Mahe, the main island of the Seychelles. Supposedly the territory of Seychelles comprises 100 well more or less large islands, which together form an area of ​​443 km ². How strewn lie the islands of the western Indian Ocean, spread over an ocean area of ​​over 400,000 km “. The climate in the Seychelles is tropical with an average temperature of 27 degrees Celsius. The weather here is influenced by the monsoon, with a hot and humid season from November to March. The “cool” dry season lasts from May to October. We are now – at the end of October – just in the transitional phase there and hope not to be trampled in the rainy season.

For the flight to Bird Island we were picked up by a taxi from our resort in the south of Mahe and brought to the small airport of Mahe. The formalities were completed quickly. But there is still a problem with the luggage. They are allowed a maximum of 10kg per passenger. Ok, go for the luggage storage. In the waiting room we could already see our small plane on the runway. When we are finally released from the waiting room to the aircraft, we find that it is already hot and humid out there on the tarmac. But on the plane the temperature is even higher by a few degrees. Finally, we sit in the narrow leather seats, tighten the seat belt and wait for the things that are coming. Finally, the folding doors of the twin-engine aircraft is closed. Immediately, the temperature in the cabin starts to rise further. Only a minute later, the shirt is wet, thick beads of sweat forming on the forehead and run down his eyebrows. “Hopefully the plane will start soon”, which at the moment is my only wish. Through the open cabin I can see the two pilots at the start. At the front a small table fan rotates. “They will know why they put up this utensil in the cockpit”, this is what I am thinking. Much too slowly the pilots are dropping the headphones. Then the pilot turns to his passengers, friendly smiles at us and raises his thumb.

Finally, the plane takes off from the runway. You can feel the sigh of passengers formally, now just sit back and relax. We quickly leave the main island of Mahe behind us. Some uninhabited rocky islands lie off the main island, we only see the deep blue open sea before us. The two engines roar loudly and evenly in the air.

Bird Island is our goal. This tiny island is located about 100 kilometers north of Mahe and can be reached in the aircraft in 45 minutes. Bird Island is a flat coral island overgrown with palm trees. In former times the island was used for a plantation. Besides Denis Iceland is the only coral island in the Seychelles, which is inhabited. The Bird Island is famous for its many seabirds that breed here. The beautiful Fairy Tern (Gygis alba) is one of our target birds because we are traveling to this remote coral island. Moreover, migration seasons is on. Maybe we can see the one or the other migratory bird far from the migration routs along the East African coast. That we were very successful with this, I can prove with photos in the gallery very Continue reading Bird Island, a paradise for the Fairy Tern