Tag Archives: Curlew Sandpiper

Graubrust-Strandläufer in der West-Paläarktis

Graubrust-StrandläuferMit einem Graubruststrandläufer (Calidris melanotos) im Mehldorfer Speicherkoog fing vor Jahren die Suche nach Irrgästen, nach nationalen Seltenheiten, in Deutschland an. Wenig später war klar, daß Graubruststrandläufer in Mitteleuropa seltene, aber regelmäßige Gäste sind. Damals vermutet man, daß Graubrust-Strandläufer, wie andere Ausnahmeerscheinungen und Irrgäste, aufgrund starker Stürme über den Ozean verdriftet worden waren. Beim Graubruststrandläufer können damit jedoch lediglich die im September und Oktober vor allem in Westeuropa entdeckten Vögel erklärt werden. Erste (Wegzug-)Nachweise gelingen in Europa alljährlich bereits ab Mitte Juli, das heißt deutlich vor der Zeit der Herbststürme. Zudem konzentrieren sich in Großbritannien die Nachweise zunächst auf die östliche Küste Englands. Auf den Azoren ist der doert als pilrito-de-colete bekannte Graubruststrandläufer bei weitem nicht so dominant in der Irrgästeliste wie in Mitteleuropa. Im November gibt es bisher gar keine Meldung und vom Oktober wurden im Maximum 4 Exemplare allein von der Insel Terceira bekannt. Der Heimzug von Calidris melanotos durch Deutschland erstreckt sich von Mitte April bis Mitte Juni, ab Anfang Juli erscheinen erste Altvögel auf dem Wegzug. Erst vier Wochen später ist mit den ersten Jungvögeln zu rechnen.

Erschwerend kommt dazu, daß die Zahl der an der Ostküste Nordamerikas in ihre Winterquartiere in Lateinamerika wandernden Graubruststrandläufer eher gering ist. Für rund 90% der Population wird eine Zugroute durch das zentrale Nordamerika angenommen – auch wenn das Foto des Blogs von der Atlantikküste North Carolinas stammt. Es fragt sich, ob die recht hohe Zahl von Continue reading Graubrust-Strandläufer in der West-Paläarktis

High Lonesome BirdTours St. Paul Trip 2016

HornlundThe High Lonesome BirdTours trip to St. Paul Island this year was successful beyond expectations. Not only did we get great looks at all the seabirds, ranging from auklets, murres, puffins, and kittiwakes, we also managed to time our arrival just right to catch up with a slew of vagrant birds. The list of shorebirds that were found on the island during our stay included dozens of Wood Sandpipers, several Longtoed Stints, Common Greenshank, Common Snipe, and a breeding plumaged Curlew Sandpiper (quite rare in Alaska). A Brambling was also a nice find, but was trumped (I think we all agreed) by a stunning male Siberian Rubythroat which we all managed to see well, even in the scope!

Another welcome rarity was a male Tufted Duck spotted among the common Northern Pintails on Salt Lagoon during our first evening on the island. The seabird cliffs of course never disappoint with Least, Parakeet, and Crested auklets in full swing, plus the Pribilof speciality, Redlegged Kittiwake. We studied the Kittiwake in flight, Continue reading High Lonesome BirdTours St. Paul Trip 2016

Sichelstrandläufer: Beobachtungen wann und wo?

SichelstrandläuferEin Vogel der hohen Arktis – der Mornellregenpfeifer (Charadrius morinellus oder Eudromias morinellus) – ist vor einiger Zeit bei bird-lens.com besprochen worden. Ein weiterer Brutvogel der hohen Arktis kann vor allem die Vogelbeobachter an den Küsten immer erfreuen. Es handelt sich um den Sichelstrandläufer (Calidris ferruginea). Auch wenn vor allem das wunderschöne, rostrote Brutgefieder des Sichelstrandläufers ein besonderer ästhetischer Anblick ist, so ist doch der Anblick dieses Watvogels in Küstensalzwiesen und Lagunen ein fesselnder Anblick für jedermann. Die Sichelstrandläufer (Calidris ferruginea), die durch Europa ziehen überwintern wohl vor allem in Süd- und Westafrika und Südwesteuropa. Wer also auf Nummer Sicher gehen will, schaut sich diese Limikole in ihrem Winterquartier z.B. an den Ufern des Berg River in der Nähe der Ortschaft Velddrif am Atlantik an. Dabei sind sowohl die trockenfallenen Schlammflächen des Flusses nach der Flut als auch die sogenannten Kliphoek Salinen in der Nähe von Velddrif vielversprechend. Neben Zwergstrandläufer (Calidris minuta) und Continue reading Sichelstrandläufer: Beobachtungen wann und wo?

Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other waders in Thailand on wintering grounds

Spoonbill SandpiperThe Spoon-billed Sandpiper is one of the big megas in the birding space – not only for twitchers, but Thailand in general is an excellent birding destination.

During a trip to Thailand in January 2011 I was looking for wintering birds from the palearctic. The whole trip was a great success, seeing especially many waders which are rare in the western palearctic like Mongolian Plover (Charadrius mongolus), Greater Sand Plover (Charadrius leschenaultia), Great Knot (Calidris tenuirostris), Pintail Snipe (Gallinago stenura) and Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus).

But many birders go for the Spoon-billed Sandpipers. For general directions and travel advice visit Nick Upton’s excellent website Thaibirding.com. At the known Spoon-billed Sandpiper site at Pak Thale I spend 3 days. This location is very reliable, with several individuals seen each day there, and up to 3 at once. For details of locations you can also check out these Google maps.  They show the  Spoon-billed Sandpiper distribution not only in Thailand.

At the first time there were Temminck’s Stint (Calidris temminckii) and surprisingly 3 Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus). I teamed up with a group of german birdwatchers. We also saw one individual Spoon-billed Sandpiper at a site which is called the “Derelict Building” –site in Nick Upton’s description. This site is closer (only 2 km) from a little town called Laem Pak Bia. Behind a dam, drive a dirt track passing a garbage dump and you will see the shallow saltpans already. There were masses of egrets, waders and gulls. So we quickly saw Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus), Pacific Golden-Plover (Pluvialis fulva), Common Greenshank (Tringa nebularia), Rufous-necked Stint (Calidris ruficollis), Long-toed Stint (Calidris subminuta), Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea), Broad-billed Sandpiper, (Limicola falcinellus) and many flying Common and Whiskered Tern Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) and Whiskered Tern (Chlidonias hybridus). A nice selection of the birds occuring you will find here!

But the best place on finding Spoon-billed Sandpipers in Thailand is certainly at Continue reading Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other waders in Thailand on wintering grounds

Bird migration in late fall on Seychelles – an abstract

Escaping the cold and shorts days in Germany in late fall is a real privilege. This time the target was the Seychelles Islands. Relaxing and birdwatching is both possible on these famous island near the equator. Whereas the bigger islands as Mahé or Praslin are famous for its endemic (and rare) land birds the smaller islands are famous for huge seabird colonies where several thousands of birds breed in densely packed colonies on rocks, sandy beaches and trees. Looking mainly for western palearctic birds to complete the gallery for www.bird-lens.com the real thrill was to find migrating birds. Late fall is a perfect months as you find migrating and wintering birds side by side with the above mentioned endemics and sea birds. Birds visiting Seychelles also include a good number of Asian species which are vagrants to the western palearctic, too. Another good reason to travel to the Seychelles. But anyway, the list of all birds recorded in Seychelles is long and includes visitors from almost all over the globe. Thus one more reason to do the trip and shoulder the long flight.

During this 2-week journey at the end of October/ beginning of November it was possible to visit the bigger islands as well as small islands like Bird Island. Here we were very successful with several waders like Grey (Black-bellied) Plover, Pluvialis squatarola, Common Ringed Plover, Charadrius hiaticula, Common Sandpiper, Actitis hypoleucos, Little Stint, Calidris minuta, Curlew Sandpiper, Calidris ferruginea, as you see in that gallery.

Whereas these birds are regular visitors to coasts of the Western Palearctic too, the good numbers of both Mongolian (Lesser Sand) Plover, Charadrius mongolus, as well as the Greater Sand Plover, Charadrius leschenaultii, were a most welcomed observation. The black-and-white Crab Plover, Dromas ardeola, was another Continue reading Bird migration in late fall on Seychelles – an abstract

Top Birds at Romania´s Black Sea Coast

South of the Danube Delta is a wide stretch of a sandy shoreline with shallow lagoons. This is part of Romania´s Black Sea coast. May is Migration and early breeding time. Whereas the association of the east Romanian countryside is normally with the core Danube Delta with its speciality birds like Pelicans, Black-necked and Red-necked Grebes, Glossy Ibises, Spoonbills, the stretch of coast just south of the Danube Delta up to the northern city limits of Constanta is an excellent birding spot, too. A small group of bird photographers went for that countryside, with the area called Dobrudja more to the west and the area of Vadu at the coast. The tour was organized by Sakertours. The Bird Diversity we enjoyed was high; over 90 species of birds we found in only 3 days, some had just arrived from their wintering grounds in Africa. Highlights of the tour you will find in the gallery. Among others we made photoshots of Great Bittern, Botaurus stellaris, European Honey-buzzard, Pernis apivorus, Montagu’s Harrier, Circus pygargus, Long-legged Buzzard, Buteo rufinus, Lesser Spotted Eagle, Aquila pomarina, Imperial Eagle, Aquila heliaca, 2 species of Sparrowhawks Continue reading Top Birds at Romania´s Black Sea Coast