Tag Archives: Cape Hatteras

Red-necked Phalarope: Migration in the Western Palearctic

OdinshühnchenRed-necked Phalaropes (Phalaropus lobatus) are mainly known as colorful breeding birds of the Arctic tundra of Eurasia and North America. The more colorful females advertise with conspicuous courtship flights around the males, which later take care for the offspring. Following the breeding time, Red-necked Phalaropes are pronounced migratory birds. Now they change to their simple black and white non-breeding dress. In small numbers Red-necked Phalarope migrate over Germany annually. About the migration routes and the wintering areas of individual populations, however, relatively little is known. Already at the beginning of the 20th century, it was known that most of the European Red-necked Phalarope winter on the open sea. The wintering areas are dotted in the tropical seas. Well-known wintering areas are known off the west coast of South America, in the southwest Pacific and in the northwest of the Indian Ocean. A well-known area lies in the Arabian Sea. Very late, it was discovered that even on the Atlantic off the coast of West Africa Red-necked Phalarope spend the winter. It is not yet known exactly from where Red-necked Phalarope on migration over in Germany are coming and in which winter quarters they are traveling. If one previously followed the theory that there are Icelandic breeding birds on a southeastern route to Arabia, it seems today also imaginable that birds from Scandinavia rest in Germany, which winter off the West African coast.

The breeding season of the Red-necked Phalarope starts in late May. Although the birds are now in their breeding plumage, the spring passage in Germany from early May to early June is not very noticeable. Far more noticeable is the autumn migration, which extends over a longer period from mid-July to October. Females, Continue reading Red-necked Phalarope: Migration in the Western Palearctic

White-rumped Sandpiper in Brandenburg at Gülper lake

WeißbürzelstrandläuferThe White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis) – initially recorded as Baird’s Sandpiper (Calidris bairdii) – from Lake Gülper was intended to be observed on Saturday, July 22nd. Already at 7:00 am I arrived after 2 hours’ drive at the southeast corner of the small village Prietzen at the south end of Lake Gülper. Some birders had already placed their cars along the road. But on Saturday morning nobody had seen the bird in the Havelaue already.

Since Wednesday, July 19, the White-rumped Sandpiper had been seen loosely associated with river Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius), Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) and a Little Stint (Calidris minuta) on the sands on the banks of the southern shore. The White-rumped Sandpiper was busily searching for food with little resting phases. The bird was steadily to be seen until evening.

The southern shore of Lake Gülper is, however, crowded in summer by thousands of resting geese, predominantly Greylag Goose (Anser anser). For longer periods of time, White-rumped Sandpiper could not be found between the Greylag Geese. Thus, e.g. on Friday, July 21, 2017 between 7:45 and 8:00 pm, the bird could only be discovered after a White-tailed Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) had flushed all the Greylag Geese. Before that, he had not been seen Continue reading White-rumped Sandpiper in Brandenburg at Gülper lake

Weissbürzel-Strandläufer am Gülper See

WeißbürzelstrandläuferDer anfangs als Bairdstrandläufer (Calidris bairdii)  bestimmte Weißbürzelstrandläufer (Calidris fuscicollis) vom Gülper See sollte am Samstag, den 22. Juli beobachtet werden. Schon um 7:00 war ich die 2 Stunden angereist und stellte den Wagen am Südostausgang des kleinen Dörfchens Prietzen am Südende des Gülper Sees ab. Einige Birder waren schon unterwegs. Am Samstagmorgen  hatte aber noch niemand den Vogel in der Havelaue gesehen.

Der Weißbürzelstrandläufer war seit Mittwoch, 19. Juli, locker mit Flußregenpfeifern (Charadrius dubius), Flußuferläufern (Actitis hypoleucos)  und einem Zwergstrandläufer (Calidris minuta) vergesellschaftet auf den Sandflächen am Uferrand des dicht mit Mauserfedern bedeckten Südufers gesichtet worden. Der Weißbürzelstrandläufer war  hauptsächlich auf Nahrungssuche mit wenig Ruhephasen zu sehen und anfangs stetig bis abends anwesend.

Das Südufer des Gülper Sees wird allerdings im Sommer von Tausenden rastenden Gänsen, ganz überwiegend Graugänsen (Anser anser), bevölkert. Über längere Zeiträume konnte der Weißbürzelstrandläufer zwischen den Graugänsen nicht Continue reading Weissbürzel-Strandläufer am Gülper See