Tag Archives: Anthus cinnamomeus

Malindi Pipit (Anthus melindae) in the Arabuke-Sokoke Forest/ Kenya

MalindipieperA Pipit takes flight as we approach the dry, low grassy area. Our Guide calls immediately: this is not Malindi Pipit (Anthus melindae) but an African Pipit (Anthus cinnamomeus). Already on the Sabaki River Delta we had searched for the Malindi Pipit in the sparsely vegetated grasslands in vain. Our Guide says that the previously highly populated plain has been abandoned because agriculture reduces available habitat. In the specific case on the Sabaki River Delta probably a salt production should be established. Politicians currently seem to be investing in salt production along the coast. This is of course a big threat. The areas for the salines, i.e. the evaporation areas, the technical facilities and the dikes will of course dramatically reduce the available habitat for this species. But the transformation of agriculture, including the cultivation of biofuels, is also a major threat. Overall, he sees a great threat to the survival of this species, at least in the vicinity of Malindi.

In the Arabuke Sokoke Forest, however, he was able to see the Malindi Pipit near the so-called elephant swamp. Because there is nowhere around but the only place to see the Pipit. The swamp is not bad at all. Nevertheless, Our Guide cannot feel comfortable in the area, because you never know when and if elephants would Continue reading Malindi Pipit (Anthus melindae) in the Arabuke-Sokoke Forest/ Kenya

Strenuous hike for Mount Kupé Bushshrike

SchnäpperwürgerWe had a very good breakfast at 5:30. John-Pierre and his team were busy supplying us with a lot of food. We departed at 6:00 with our Rockjumper-guide along the Max’s Trail through farm bush with palms and banana trees up on Mt Kupé. The other option is the Shrike Trail which is a famous, but also very steep and narrow trail. Fortunately the climate is more comfortable here in the forests of the Eastern Moutain Arc than in the lowlands.

The initial stretches of the Max’s Trail is even, getting steeper in the open canopy forest and becomes insanely steep inside primary forest. The last patch we did inside primary forest, we did not see especially many birds. It was a fairly quiet forest. But he continued with our heads down our way up to the altitude where the Bushshrike can be found. Short stops along the way to catch our breath yielded a few nice birds such as Grey-throated Greenbul resp. Western Mountain Greenbul (Andropadus tephrolaemus) and 2 Yellow-billed Turacos (Tauraco macrorhynchus). A nice bird was a female of a African Shrike-flycatcher (Bias flammulatus or Megabyas flammulatus),

In contrast to a year later in the Bakossi Mountains, we did not even hear Mount Kupe Bushshrike (Chlorophoneus kupeensis) at an Continue reading Strenuous hike for Mount Kupé Bushshrike